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Author Topic: Dogs Mimic Their Owners' Facial Expressions  (Read 246 times)

Offline DeeDee

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Dogs Mimic Their Owners' Facial Expressions
« on: January 26, 2017, 10:09:36 AM »
This just tells me that they understand us as much as some of us have been saying all along. Cats probably understand too. They just don't care. 
funny2 funny2 funny2

Quote
Dogs May Mimic Owners' Facial Expressions, Too

If you smile at your dog, does he smile back? The researchers believe, given their findings that dogs mimic the emotional states of other dogs, that dogs can mimic their owners' facial expressions as well, especially if they're closely bonded. Seeker reported:4

"'It is an automatic response, similar to that of humans when they see someone crying or smiling,' [lead author Elisabetta] Palagi [,Ph.D.,]said, adding that domestication probably even enhanced dogs' natural inclination toward emotional contagion all the more."

The totality of evidence is showing that dogs have many complex ways of communicating with and understanding not only other dogs but also humans.

The researchers pointed out that dogs follow others' gaze, head and body orientation, and combine body postures, including head and tail movements, to communicate their emotional states.

They also use their eyes, lips and teeth expressively and "regularly express their positive emotional states via specific signals that are performed through both the face (relaxed open mouth … and the body (play bow)."

Further, dogs can discriminate between emotional expressions on human faces and body postures. For instance, research published in Biology Letters found dogs recognize both dog and human emotions.5

The dogs were presented with either human or dog faces with different expressions (happy and playful versus angry and aggressive). The faces were paired with a vocalization that was positive, negative or neutral.

More at: http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2017/01/26/dogs-mimic-owners-facial-expressions.aspx
"In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn't merely try to train him to be semihuman. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming partly a dog." Edward Hoagland
"Thorns may hurt you, men desert you, sunlight turn to fog; but you're never friendless ever, if you have a dog."

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