Author Topic: Brushing kitty's teeth  (Read 7549 times)

Offline Pookie

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Re: Brushing kitty's teeth
« Reply #30 on: September 18, 2011, 03:22:59 PM »
When Pookie's sister was at the holistic vet over a year ago, the vet told me to give her aloe juice and I said the same thing:  that aloe is toxic to cats.  I can't remember exactly what she said, but I think she said only in large amounts.  I did finally give it to his sister (I was desperate), mixing it in her wet food, and as far as I could tell it didn't seem to bother her.  I don't know if there are cumulative effects, though.

Gizzards are the throat muscles of the chicken or turkey and don't contain any bone.  They're very tough so they're a good workout for the jaws.  I do give Pookie gizzards a couple of times a week, but as FMM said, I've noticed he tends to "chew" them using one side of his mouth.  He has gingivitis on the side that he doesn't use as much.

When he went in for his annual check-up, I did give the vet a stool sample and mentioned that my Mighty Hunter had caught a mouse in my basement and eaten it before I could get it away from him.  Maybe I just got lucky, but the fecal came back negative for parasites.  (whew!)  I'm not too worried about the feeder mice having parasites because they are frozen, and as FMM said, they're bred for this purpose so they should be safe.  Unfortunately, nothing is ever 100% safe:  we feed canned and hope that the company we're buying from will be honest and responsible.  So there are no guarantees.  As for the days of being blissfully ignorant . . . I hear ya loud and clear, MC.
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Offline Pookie

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Re: Brushing kitty's teeth
« Reply #31 on: September 19, 2011, 04:16:50 PM »
I was on Dr. Hofve's site to see if she had any suggestions on dental products for kitties.  She mentions the C.E.T. Forte Chews do a good job.  I did a quick search for the ingredients and found this:

C.E.T. Oral Hygiene Chews for Cats:
Guaranteed Analysis Amount
Crude Protein (min.) 40.0%
Crude Fat (min.) 40.0%
Crude Fiber (max.) 0.5%
Moisture (max.) 5.0%
Other Ingredients (per chew):
Freeze-dried fish, antioxidants (containing tocopherols, ascorbic acid, natural flavor and citric acid), glucose oxidase (Aspergillus niger), dried whey protein concentrate.

Sigh . . . the search continues . . .
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Offline Lola

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Re: Brushing kitty's teeth
« Reply #32 on: September 20, 2011, 11:50:29 AM »

Sigh . . . the search continues . . .


If you find anything...let us know!  Goooood luck!  I don't think there is anything, manufactured for pets, that doesn't have some sort of ingredient issue.   bangshead
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Offline Pookie

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Re: Brushing kitty's teeth
« Reply #33 on: September 24, 2011, 10:50:47 AM »
I did a quick search on "natural ways to clean a cat's teeth" and found this:   http://www.ehow.com/way_5270198_natural-remedies-clean-cats-teeth.html

Has anyone ever heard of sangre de drago?  Any idea if it's safe for kitties?  I did some quick searches and didn't find much, though what I did find made it seem safe and effective.  However, one search I did mentioned that it shouldn't be used in people with leukemia as it seems to make the disease worse.   :o  I have no idea how accurate that is.  The few things I saw, including the link posted above, kept saying to use it once a month (after the initial period of using it for a week to 10 days).  If anyone can find anything on sangre de drago (or sangre de grado) and the safety/efficacy of using it on dogs and cats for teeth issues, please share.

Thanks!
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Offline Middle Child

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Re: Brushing kitty's teeth
« Reply #34 on: September 24, 2011, 04:22:10 PM »
I found this:

Quote
Sangre de Grado appears to be safe for most people. When applied to the skin, Sangre de Grado can cause pain, burning, and scarring.

Not something I would want to put into my cat's mouth.

Offline Pookie

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Re: Brushing kitty's teeth
« Reply #35 on: May 11, 2014, 04:52:16 PM »
Question to FMM:  Are you still using that homemade dental cleanser with the aloe and hydrogen peroxide, and if so, did it work?

I just discovered that one of Pookie's bottom fangs is missing.   :'(  I feel so bad . . . I should have been brushing his teeth . . . :(
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Offline Lola

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Re: Brushing kitty's teeth
« Reply #36 on: May 13, 2014, 01:43:27 PM »
We all should be brushing our cats teeth.  Sooooo much easier said than done! 
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Offline Pookie

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Re: Brushing kitty's teeth
« Reply #37 on: May 13, 2014, 02:03:38 PM »
I called the acupuncture vet (I'm still on the waitlist) today to get information on who they send their patients to for dentals.  The person I'd originally talked to had said those places are ok with doing dentals on pets that weren't current on vaccinations.  I wasn't sure if this vet had to see Pookie or give a referral, so I wanted to find out.

Yes, she would have to give a referral, and since Pookie isn't currently a patient, by law she can't do that.  I could call these places and ask if they'd take him.  I'm assuming he needs a dental, since he lost a tooth.  When I'd chatted with the person on the original call and mentioned his lip issue, she wondered if it was due to his teeth.  So that adds to my assumption.

I did ask the lady today if there was something the acupuncture vet recommended to clean his teeth.  This is the product she had:  Maxi-Guard oral gel.  Here are the ingredients:

Maxi Guard Oral Gel an oral cleansing gel that cleanses and freshens with or without brushing. Active Ingredient(s): Deionized water, zinc gluconate, ascorbic acid (vitamin C), methylcellulose, taurine, methylparaben, propylparaben, F.D.&C. blue no. 1. May also contain zinc sulfate

*sigh*  I don't think I'm comfortable with anything that has methylcellulose, unless it's something different than what I think it is.  Thoughts?

On a side note:  if he does need a dental, I find it interesting that he spent the first 5+ years of his life on a dry/canned diet and never needed one, but may need one when he's not getting ANY dry, and gets a combination canned/raw (including chicken tenders, hearts and cut up gizzards [to prevent horking]) diet now.  Go figure.   :-\
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Offline Lola

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Re: Brushing kitty's teeth
« Reply #38 on: May 13, 2014, 02:35:42 PM »
From listening to others (and my own previous experience)...I don't think the average vet is big on dentals, unless there is something screaming obvious going on.  I think many vets go by age also.  Don't quote me though.

Has Pookie ever had a dental cleaning or dental x-rays?  I ask because none of ours ever "needed" dental work or cleaning...until recently.  Like humans, I think a dental should be done...whether it looks like they need one or not. 
My vet (and some online vets) recommend once a year.  It makes sense, but I'm not sure if I will be on board with that timeline though.

Kibble does do a LOT of damage to teeth.  Canned and raw can't undo the damage.

From what Dr. Pierson, and other vets I trust, have said...the brushing is the most important.  Not so much the "toothpaste." 

I would also assume Pookie needs to be seen, since losing a tooth.






« Last Edit: May 13, 2014, 02:39:59 PM by Lola »
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Offline Middle Child

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Re: Brushing kitty's teeth
« Reply #39 on: May 13, 2014, 04:08:02 PM »
I don't brush.  I'm too afraid to do damage to their gums or enamel.  I can't find a brush I would be comfortable using, and my vet warned against gauze as too abrasive.  I don't like ANY of the for pets pastes or additives.  They all have bad things in them.

I think dental health is largely genetic in cats, of course I think that it makes me feel better to think that, but look at Mazy, kibble diet for 6 years, and her teeth are great.  The vet picked some tartar off when she had her ears done (under anesthesia)  I don't believe for one tiny second that the kibble kept her teeth healthy.  I think she was born with good teeth.

Tolly Angel was on a canned diet all his life, and I used the c.e.t on him at least once a week for many years.  yet he had FORL and had to have dentals almost yearly after about age 5, usually with extractions.

Ootay Angel did not have her first dental until she was 17 1/2 years old.

Bibbs Angel needed her first when she was 8, and then had one every two years after that.

Queen Eva (just past 3 at last check up) and Jennie (approx. 8 1/2 at last check up) both have good strong teeth with no tartar yet.

My vet is not pushy on dentals, she checks teeth very carefully, will show me any problems she might see, but is not in a hurry to recommend dentals, though she does wish I would brush with something. It's just something I am not going to worry about, there are too many other things!

Offline Pookie

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Re: Brushing kitty's teeth
« Reply #40 on: May 13, 2014, 04:17:40 PM »
No, Pookie's never had dental x-rays or a cleaning.  His teeth, at least according to the various vets he saw over the years, never saw a problem, except for the last one who said he had some gingivitis but he didn't need a cleaning.  Idiot that I am, I believed him because Pookie had always had good teeth.  Now I'm wondering . . .  :(

His sister (littermate), on the other hand, had 4 teeth removed when she was 2 years old.   :o  And I remember thinking to myself, "How could she need to have 4 removed when she's getting the dry?"  Then I thought, "Wow, how many would she have lost if she wasn't getting the dry to clean her teeth?"   :-[ Doh1 bangshead bangshead bangshead bangshead

I was thinking of just using my finger as a "brush."  It may not be great, but I would think it's better than nothing, and it would DEFINITELY be easier to get in his mouth.  I'm just trying to figure out what kind of "toothpaste" or cleanser to put on it.  I would think some sort of product would be more effective than just my finger, wouldn't it?   :-\  Or would my finger be "good enough?"
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Offline Lola

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Re: Brushing kitty's teeth
« Reply #41 on: May 13, 2014, 05:28:22 PM »
To be CLEAR, I am not arguing with either of you.  The following is what I THINK I know and/or believe.  ;) 

A vet isn't going to know the exact condition of a cat's teeth, without doing a thorough check.  My opinion comes from... all our cats' teeth were fine, until recent dentals.  Some still have fine teeth.  Others... gum disease, tooth resorption, missing teeth, etc.  To ME, all that didn't happen over night. 

I also don't believe most vets place dental care very high up on the list.  That is maybe why most cats have teeth that are fine.  ?? 

I've read that a minimum of brushing 4x a week is needed, to make any kind of difference. 

I do believe genetics also play a role in the health of a cat's teeth.

If I was the perfect cat mom (by my own standards)... I would brush their teeth daily, with a soft pet tooth brush...and no "toothpaste." 

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Offline Middle Child

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Re: Brushing kitty's teeth
« Reply #42 on: May 13, 2014, 06:12:08 PM »
Pookie: when I used the c.e.t I used my finer to rub it on their teeth (the outside edges) and gums, following my vet's advice.

Lola: I know you aren't arguing.  We're all in this together, trying to sort it out.  HeadButt

Offline Pookie

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Re: Brushing kitty's teeth
« Reply #43 on: May 14, 2014, 08:42:33 AM »
Lola: I know you aren't arguing.  We're all in this together, trying to sort it out.  HeadButt

Exactly.

I would prefer Pookie not lose anymore teeth if I can help it.  And it shouldn't surprise me (but it does) that dental health wouldn't be high on a vet's list.   >:(  I did read something last night, which was a "statement of the obvious" but I hadn't really thought about it, that most of what he's eating is "soft" food (canned), including the raw RadCat and Primal.  Other than the chicken hearts (which he barely gnaws on), the gizzards (which I have to cut up or he might get blocked and regurgitate) and the tenders (at least those he gnaws on), there's nothing to really "clean" off his teeth.  I just haven't worked up the nerve to give him bones.   :-[ :(

Gotta run, but I'll post more later.  Thanks, everyone!   :-* HeadButt
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Offline Lola

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Re: Brushing kitty's teeth
« Reply #44 on: May 14, 2014, 10:27:42 AM »
Since cats dont chew their food, where does the cleaning enter the picture?  Mine dont gnaw.  They tear the big chunks up into smaller pieces and swallow.  Raw is the best choice for sure, but I ASSuME the biggest benefit is the fact that it is a natural diet. 

Putting aside all the other kibble causing diseases...it is full of MAJOR carpy ingredients, that stick to the teeth! The ingredients, alone, are a recipe for dental disaster. 

Canned isnt natural and it is commercially made, but it is still a HUGE step above kibble. Not just for dental health... overall health. 

PS i dont want to see any of my cats lose their teeth either.  However, Lucy is missing 6 teeth.....back teeth.  Upper and lower, right and left sides.  You would never know it.  She doesnt hesitate, when she rips into raw chunks. 
« Last Edit: May 15, 2014, 03:12:46 AM by Lola, Reason: left a word out... as I often do. grrrr »
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