Author Topic: Detecting Your Pet’s Pain Level Is Easier Than You Ever Thought Possible  (Read 301 times)

Offline DeeDee

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Not exactly Alternative Healing, but Alternative Knowledge:

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Apparently, researchers have been hard at work using infrared thermography (IRT) to determine how dogs are feeling in certain situations. How cool is that?

Thermography is a non-invasive technique that allows for the visualization of temperature changes in the body, affording researchers the ability to evaluate physiological changes, and perhaps emotional states, in a wide variety of animals (including humans). Julie Hecht, writing for Scientific American, describes it this way:

“When you are frightened, blood rushes away from your extremities to get your muscles ready to go, which means your extremities get cooler as your core gets warmer. Infrared thermography, which captures changes to body surface temperature, is going to pick this up.

The tip of a scared person’s nose gets cooler (more blue) under an infrared camera, and studies find that when scared or distressed, rat paws and tails appear cooler, as do the outer parts of sheep and rabbit ears.”1

More at: http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2017/04/24/thermography-in-veterinary-medicine.aspx

Definitely a cool tool that sort of lets the pet "talk" about how they feel.
"In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn't merely try to train him to be semihuman. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming partly a dog." Edward Hoagland
"Thorns may hurt you, men desert you, sunlight turn to fog; but you're never friendless ever, if you have a dog."

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