Author Topic: Specific Cat Behavior  (Read 97 times)

Offline DeeDee

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Specific Cat Behavior
« on: November 09, 2017, 10:11:05 AM »
This video popped up in my timeline, and I ended up in Youtube. I understand why cats would be greatly attracted to these things (catnip), which is why I'm sure they like holding them.

But what's up with the kicking these things? Why do cats grab things then kick them with their back feet like that? It must be a common behavior b/c they call them Kick Stix.



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Offline Middle Child

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Re: Specific Cat Behavior
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2017, 03:53:40 PM »
It's hunting behavior, firstly, and defensive behavior secondly.  Cats are both hunters (predators) and hunted (prey).

They might be able to kill a mouse with a quick neck breaking shake but a rabbit would take more effort, for example.

 In defense if attacked and unable to flee (first reaction) a cat would strike out with claws, if knocked down could roll over and strike with back claws while protecting his or her tender underside.

In the case of play though, I would say it is instinctive hunting behavior.  Honing skills. :)

Offline DeeDee

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Re: Specific Cat Behavior
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2017, 04:26:30 PM »
Thank you! It was bugging me b/c I knew there had to be some kind of reason all of them were doing that, but I just couldn't figure it out since I don't see dogs doing that.
"In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn't merely try to train him to be semihuman. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming partly a dog." Edward Hoagland
"Thorns may hurt you, men desert you, sunlight turn to fog; but you're never friendless ever, if you have a dog."

Offline Pookie

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Re: Specific Cat Behavior
« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2017, 04:59:04 PM »
Pookie used to do that, with certain toys.  I called it the Bunny Kick.  That's how I knew he REALLY liked that toy.  It was play behavior, but like MC said, I'm sure it has it's roots in hunting/defense, as (almost) all play does.
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Offline Lola

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Re: Specific Cat Behavior
« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2017, 05:15:21 PM »
Ours all bunny kick ONE toy.  One MC gave them. 
A few will bunny kick a human hand, if one touches their tummy.  Sometimes that also involves teeth and claws.  lol 
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Offline Middle Child

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Re: Specific Cat Behavior
« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2017, 05:31:46 PM »
Yeah, I meant to say I make my version of those things, I call it the hug-n-kick.  Every cat I've ever made one for loves it. :) Glad to know the one I made for your kids is still holding up Lola.

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