Author Topic: Carolina Dog Breed  (Read 124 times)

Offline Lola

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Carolina Dog Breed
« on: March 11, 2018, 01:56:32 PM »
DeeDee and I were talking about this breed, in another thread.

Some info that was previously mentioned...

The breed is listed as "Carolina Wild Dog" at my vet's office.
Misa came with a micro chip.  I updated the info.  Carolina Dog wasn't in the list of breeds.
DNA testing... No listing for Carolina dog breeds.

This is a wiki article:

Quote
The Carolina dog is a landrace of medium-sized, feral dog that lives mostly in the Southeastern United States, especially in isolated stretches of longleaf pines and cypress swamps. Re-domestication of Carolina dogs has recently become popular, and they can make good domestic pets with proper socialization. Since 2008, artificial selection efforts to establish them as a standardized breed (usually capitalized as Carolina Dog) has made some progress, with recognition in two smaller national kennel clubs, and acceptance into the breed-establishment program of a major one.

Your turn DeeDee.  :)
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Offline DeeDee

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Re: Carolina Dog Breed
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2018, 02:44:22 PM »
The first sentence is the part that's absolutely irrelevant these days. It should say "previously feral dog."

Their pointing out "landrace" is of particular importance. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Landrace

Quote
A landrace is a domesticated, locally adapted,[1][2][3] traditional variety[4] of a species of animal or plant that has developed over time, through adaptation to its natural and cultural environment of agriculture and pastoralism, and due to isolation from other populations of the species.[1] Landraces are generally distinguished from cultivars, and from breeds in the standardized sense, although the term landrace breed is sometimes used as distinguished from the term standardized breed when referring to cattle.[5] The -race in this word refers to the taxonomic definition of race in biology, not the ethnographic sense of the word.

The Carolina dog from breeders are no longer feral, but it will take much education by many to make people remove that distinction from their minds. People that think of the past remain in the past, and should have as much information as possible thrown at them via anvils.

The AKC has better information on them, and they've been assigned to the Hound Group:

Quote
Fairly recent studies of the free-ranging dogs in particular regions of the United States from the Southeast through the desert Southwest have disclosed the continued existence of small primitive dogs whose appearance, behavior and ecology suggest a close ancestry with a possible descent with the dogs that accompanied man across the Bering land bridge into North America some 10,000 to 14,000 years ago.

TEMPERAMENT
Temperament: Generally shy and suspicious in nature but once a dog accepts a human into its pack, those behaviors disappear toward that human. Training: Very easily trained, eager to please, may or may not respond to treat training.

CAROLINA DOGS DIG SNOUT PITS. THESE SMALL, CONICAL DEPRESSIONS IN THE DIRT THAT EXACTLY FIT THE DOGS' MUZZLES. MOST SNOUT PITS ARE DUG BY FEMALES, BETWEEN SEPTEMBER AND JANUARY.

100% of people think they're great with kids
80% of people think they're great with other pets
100% agree that they're easily trained
40% think they're not so great with time alone  (This could be because they're definitely pack animals.)

The AKC does NOT mention the words "wild" or "feral."  Primitive would indicate that they're a very old breed.

Both of these pages are great places to study the truth about this breed, though it should be noted that many breeders of any breed still use misnomers when speaking of their chosen breed. They have jumped on some bandwagon of rarity (rare makes money), and they haven't had decent mentors nor education, but that's with any breed. Not understanding that Black Russian's temperaments have been changed from the original intent had my vet that died always going on about what they were originally. But Vlad is nothing like those BRTs of the past.

http://thecarolinadogclubofamerica.com

http://www.thecarolinadogsociety.com/index.html

You can also read more about the dogs from the UKC:

https://www.ukcdogs.com/carolina-dog

Some extra, pertinent information could be obtained by contacting any of these groups that are listed with the AKC, and I assure you, they'll talk for days about their favorite breed:


Carolina Dog Training Club, Inc.

Delegate   Mary Vanderlinden, 215 FORREST DR, REIDSVILLE, NC 27320-6711
mv@triad.rr.com
Corresponding Secretary   Lois Miller, 609 CANDLEWOOD DR, GREENSBORO, NC 27403-1102
lmiller213@triad.rr.com


Carolina Kennel Club, Inc.

Delegate   Jaimie Ashby, 102 MANCHESTER PL, GREENSBORO, NC 27410-6011
jaimie@ashby3.com
Corresponding Secretary   Linda Martin, 3502 TERRAULT DR, GREENSBORO, NC 27410-8240
lgmartin@triad.rr.com


Carolina Working Group Association

Delegate   No Current Delegate
Corresponding Secretary   Ricki Silveria, 2435 WAGNER CREEK CT, MOUNT PLEASANT, SC 29466-8050
ricki.silveria@comcast.net
« Last Edit: March 11, 2018, 02:56:03 PM by DeeDee »
"In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn't merely try to train him to be semihuman. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming partly a dog." Edward Hoagland
"Thorns may hurt you, men desert you, sunlight turn to fog; but you're never friendless ever, if you have a dog."

Offline Lola

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Re: Carolina Dog Breed
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2018, 02:52:55 PM »
I originally thought about just copying and pasting your words, from the other thread.  Something told me not to.  Glad I didn't!  :)
Goooood info!

 thumbsup1
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Offline DeeDee

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Re: Carolina Dog Breed
« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2018, 03:20:01 PM »
If I were you, the next time I was in that office, I'd say:

Please remove "wild" from my dog's breed. Carolina dogs are foundation stock in the AKC, and as such, no longer resemble the formerly feral breed of dog that they came from originally. To have "wild" in the name insinuates that someone went to the swamps somewhere and trapped a feral dog. This is far from the truth of today's Carolina Dog, and to refer to them as such only hurts the perceptions of others that don't know the breed.
"In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn't merely try to train him to be semihuman. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming partly a dog." Edward Hoagland
"Thorns may hurt you, men desert you, sunlight turn to fog; but you're never friendless ever, if you have a dog."

Offline Lola

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Re: Carolina Dog Breed
« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2018, 03:44:48 PM »
I think I mentioned it in the other thread... if not... she is on record as a Retriever Mix. 
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Offline DeeDee

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Re: Carolina Dog Breed
« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2018, 04:35:37 PM »
LOL. That'll work too.
"In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn't merely try to train him to be semihuman. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming partly a dog." Edward Hoagland
"Thorns may hurt you, men desert you, sunlight turn to fog; but you're never friendless ever, if you have a dog."

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