Author Topic: Omega 3  (Read 1619 times)

Offline Pookie

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Omega 3
« on: November 26, 2014, 02:30:27 PM »
I feel so foolish.   :-[  I'd been giving Pookie an Omega 3 that the holistic vet gave me, but didn't notice that the box stated that it should be refrigerated after opening.  Yep, you guessed it -- I kept it on the counter for the last 1-2 months.   :-[  :(

Pookie's had several tummy issues this month, and I'm wondering if it was the Omega 3.  Would the fish oil upset his tummy if it's gone rancid?  I looked at the food journal and I'm not 100% sure because he didn't throw up immediately after eating it.  It might be later that day or the next day.  This holds true for the bone broth, but I'm leaning towards the Omega 3, esp. since he had a fish allergy when he was dry-fed.  This Omega 3 is sardine and anchovy.

I'm going to stop giving him the Omega 3 for 1-2 weeks to see if there's still an issue, but wanted to ask:  would rancid fish oil cause tummy upset?  And if anyone finds my brain, would they please let me know?  I really miss it.  ::)
« Last Edit: November 26, 2014, 02:32:18 PM by Pookie »
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Offline DeeDee

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Re: Omega 3
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2014, 04:25:01 PM »
This is all I've got:

http://www.ascentahealth.com/omega-3-and-you/the-science/fish-oil-shelf-life-need-know/

and

Quote
http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/detect-spoiled-fish-oil-5039.html

However, fish oil could easily turn rancid. Not only is rancid fish oil less effective, it may also make you sick.

If it says that humans can be made sick, then I'd think it would other animals sick as well.

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Offline Lola

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Re: Omega 3
« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2014, 04:45:13 PM »
I would have ASSuMEd it didn't need to be refrigerated either.  Interesting.
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Offline DeeDee

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Re: Omega 3
« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2014, 05:03:36 PM »
The directions on Carlton Cod Liver Oil has always said:

Quote
Directions
Take one teaspoon daily AT MEALTIME. After initially opening the bottle, keep refrigerated and preferably use within 100 days.

That's the only way I knew about it. I took Cod Liver Oil for a long time before finding out I was allergic to fish and shellfish.
"In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn't merely try to train him to be semihuman. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming partly a dog." Edward Hoagland
"Thorns may hurt you, men desert you, sunlight turn to fog; but you're never friendless ever, if you have a dog."

Offline Pookie

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Re: Omega 3
« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2014, 09:21:47 PM »
Thanks, Dee!

The holistic vet had given some samples with capsules, which sealed themselves after I pricked them with the pin and didn't need refrigeration (I don't think).  I'm wondering if I should use those instead of the liquid, since I don't know if I could use the whole bottle in 90-100 days.  The vet had wanted him to get 1/2 ml every day, but he's not getting nearly that amount because he just doesn't like it.  On a good day, he gets 1/2 that amount.  He's been on the Omega 3 for about 2 months and I don't think I've used 1/4 of the bottle.

The only downside to the capsules is you don't really get every last drop out of them.  But I guess even a little is better than nothing.   :-\

*sigh*  How many times have I told myself "you do the best you can . . ."
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Offline DeeDee

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Re: Omega 3
« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2014, 10:50:01 PM »
If he had allergies when dry fed, I'd be hesitant about giving it to him at all. As my allergist is so fond of reminding me if he finds out I've been cheating, allergies cause wide-spread inflammation. Inflammation causes pain. Unfortunately for a lot of us with allergies, we crave the things we're allergic to, and we give in sometimes if it doesn't immediately cause life-threatening issues. But it can be felt afterward all over from our stomachs to our joints.

Animals are a lot smarter than humans sometimes. If an animal REALLY dislikes something, it might be because it's bad for them for some reason, and they know it. They don't like the way they feel when they get it, so they just don't want it. You might want to discuss that again with the vet before giving it anymore.

Maybe there are some alternatives for him to get the omegas without depending on fish or shellfish products?
"In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn't merely try to train him to be semihuman. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming partly a dog." Edward Hoagland
"Thorns may hurt you, men desert you, sunlight turn to fog; but you're never friendless ever, if you have a dog."

Offline Middle Child

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Re: Omega 3
« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2014, 09:00:36 AM »
I stopped krill oil 5 weeks ago.  The reason why:

I opened a new bottle of krill and the capsules looked different, a darker shade somehow.  When I squeezed out the contents, it pretty much looked the same as always, but I wans't sure.  The company claims there is no problem with the capsules.

I opened a fresh bottle with a different darte, also looked different.  I take it myself too, and found no adverse effects.

however a few weeks after opeing the new bottle, the cats seemed to be scratching a lot.  Now this was also at a time when I has using the Frojntline Plus (the reason why won't go into here) so I didbn't know if it was the flea drops.

After the frontl;ine plus was stopped the scratchi9ng continued.

So I stopped the krill.

Now, back tracking I thought krill helped with skin and coat among other things (I take it for its anti inflammatory purposes).  In the winter my girls get flaky skin and split end whiskers, I thought, in spite of the krill.

Off the krill now, their coats are nicer than ever, their skin is not flaking, and I have seen only one split end whisker so far.

Now, krill oil is not fish oil, it comes from a crustacean, not fish.  But....how is it that these things that krill is supposed to improve, actually got better after stopping it?

I've decided no more krill (or fish ) oil for the cats.

Offline Pookie

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Re: Omega 3
« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2014, 01:17:58 PM »
If he had allergies when dry fed, I'd be hesitant about giving it to him at all. As my allergist is so fond of reminding me if he finds out I've been cheating, allergies cause wide-spread inflammation. Inflammation causes pain. Unfortunately for a lot of us with allergies, we crave the things we're allergic to, and we give in sometimes if it doesn't immediately cause life-threatening issues. But it can be felt afterward all over from our stomachs to our joints.

Animals are a lot smarter than humans sometimes. If an animal REALLY dislikes something, it might be because it's bad for them for some reason, and they know it. They don't like the way they feel when they get it, so they just don't want it. You might want to discuss that again with the vet before giving it anymore.

Maybe there are some alternatives for him to get the omegas without depending on fish or shellfish products?

I assUmed that the fish allergy was triggered by the grains in the food he was eating.  I was able to feed grain-free canned with fish once the dry was removed, though I haven't fed it in years.  I generally try to avoid food with fish products because of the mercury, but I had wanted to give him some kind of fish oil for the anti-inflammatory properties, and this product was apparently fairly pure from a mercury standpoint.  I have noticed his fur seems softer, but not much else.

I kind of hate to take him off of it altogether, since the rest of his diet is probably low in Omega 3s.  But cats can't metabolize flax or other plant-based sources of Omega 3s, and I'm not aware of any other source except what comes from the sea.

At this point, I'm not sure what to do.  Maybe just keep an eye on him for a week or two to confirm that it was the rancid oil that was the culprit, and decide from there?   :-\
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Offline Pookie

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Re: Omega 3
« Reply #8 on: November 27, 2014, 01:46:12 PM »
Just for fits and giggles, I paid a visit to Dr. Hofve's site, littlebigcat.com, and she has an article about selecting Omega 3s:

http://www.littlebigcat.com/nutrition/choosing-an-omega-3-oil-for-your-pet/

Quote
Sardine, herring, and anchovy oils are, so far, more sustainable and cleaner than most other fish oils. While it’s best to use a product made specifically for pets in order to avoid the additives found in human products, many pet fish oils are quite low in potency, and may not be sufficient for your pet’s needs.

She mentions krill oil, though her concerns about that pertain to depletion in the areas where they're harvested, which deprives the animals that eat krill of their food.

She recommends this:

Quote
New Zealand greenlip mussels (Perna canaliculus, GLM) are grown under a Sustainable Farming Program that ensures the long term viability of the greenlip mussel industry, with minimum impact on the environment. GLM are bi-valve mollusks with proven value for canine arthritis.(18) GLM provide a rich source of 33 fatty acids, of which 5 are Omega 3s (including essential Omega 3s EPA, DHA, and alpha linolenic acid). One of GLM’s unique array of Omega 3s is ETA (eicosatetraenoic acid). ETA–which is not found in any other food to any measurable degree–has extremely powerful ant-inflammatory properties and is beneficial for the heart(19). GLM oil has less saturated fat, and more mono- and polyunsaturated fats, than fish oil or cod liver oil.

She goes into more detail about why she recommends it, but I don't want to steal everything from her site.  She recommends the product from Moxxor.  My only concern is that it also contains "organic white grape seed husk extract and/or kiwifruit seed oil" to deactivate free radicals.

She has a separate article just on that product:  http://www.littlebigcat.com/holistic-pet-mall/moxxor-omega-3s/

Quote
I absolutely want to emphasize that Omega-3s are THE single most important nutritional supplement you can give your pet, and I’ve said that all along. Get it here, get it there…just make sure it’s a reputable product, and use it! I believe strongly in this particular product; in fact, I joined their Veterinary Advisory Board. My co-author and my dear friend and writing partner, Dr. Celeste Yarnall, is on their Holistic Advisory Board. These folks are very serious about helping animals! But only you can decide what’s right for you and your family (fur, feathers, and all!)

One more article about omega 3s:  http://www.littlebigcat.com/nutrition/omega-3-update-more-info-more-choices/

The comments were esp. interesting.  One person asked about cats with fish allergies.  Dr. Hofve's reply:

Quote
High quality, very pure fish oil has been processed in such a way as to remove all proteins. Since allergies are nearly always to proteins, this makes fish oil safe for fish-allergic cats. However, poor quality and inexpensive fish oils may still contain proteins and may cause an allergic reaction. That is why we recommend only MOXXOR green-lipped mussel oil and Nordic Naturals fish oils for pets; we are confident that these products are the safest and best quality products available today.


Edit:  Something's been nagging at me since I posted this, and I just realized:  the other animal source of Omega 3s would be the eyes and brains of another animal.  Of course for the life of me I can't find where I read it  ::), but that's at least part of the reason why I keep thinking those omega's should be added.  Here's yet one more article from Dr. Hofve's site:  http://www.littlebigcat.com/nutrition/omega-3s-are-essential-for-your-cat/
« Last Edit: November 27, 2014, 06:26:46 PM by Pookie »
2-4-6-8  Please don't over-vaccinate!
"Pass on what you have learned."  -- Yoda, Star Wars:  Return of the Jedi

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