Author Topic: Tips And Tricks For Transitioning To Wet  (Read 3246 times)

Offline Lola

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Tips And Tricks For Transitioning To Wet
« on: August 07, 2013, 03:18:35 PM »
What were some of the methods you used to transition your kibble addicts to wet?  How easy or difficult was it? 

I used a lot of the tips found here:  www.catinfo.org

Forum friends were also a HUGE help also.  Lots of trial and error and... patience.  :)

One very important thing to remember... NEVER let a cat go without food, for very long.  A cat can starve his/her self to death... or have major medical issues, from lack of food.   Cats3
« Last Edit: August 08, 2013, 02:10:56 AM by Lola »
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Offline Pookie

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Re: Tips And Tricks For Transitioning To Wet
« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2013, 04:42:18 PM »
It was very easy for me because I'd been feeding both wet and dry, so all I had to do was get rid of the dry.  They kept looking for the feeder, esp. Pookie, but after a while they stopped looking for it.  They had always LOOOOOOVED the wet food, so it was just trial and error on how much to feed and how often, because sometimes one would eat too fast and hork it back up, or I would feed the next meal too close to the first.  And I think it took a while for their systems to adjust (maybe they were de-toxing?).

Side note: every time Pookie walked by the area where the dry food used to be, looking for it, I'd say, "Nope, it's not there, and you're never eating that again if I have anything to say about it."   :D
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Offline The Kittens

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Re: Tips And Tricks For Transitioning To Wet
« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2013, 11:28:25 PM »
Bump was one, that just, would not.....eat any wet..... at all...... period.  He was the President of the "I ain't eatin no wet food club"

Due to his HCM, he was put on a grain free food. He held out, would not eat a one of them, he wanted his Good Life. Until I tried Blue Wilderness. He was at the point, of the vet just wanted him, to eat something, and was on the verge, of letting him go back to Good Life.

Once he ate the Blue Wilderness, the vet felt, we needed to stop "messin" with him, he was liable to start to refuse that.

So to get the extra water in him, we mixed his dry, with baby food and water, so it was like a broth, and he loved that, so, thats what he ate.

There are some, that just will not eat wet, and you have to yeild to that. The object of the game, is to make sure they eat, and meal time is not stressful for them, another reason, we stopped.

The kittens will eat anything, they are little garbage disposals, LOL.

To switch them over, I did it the same way, you switch them to anything, you do it over a period of time.

I took 2 weeks.

I gradually, started putting just a smidge of wet food, in with their dry food, they hardly even noticed it was in there, mixed with their dry. Over 2 weeks, I very very gradually, increased the amount of wet food, at the end of the first week, I gradually decreased, the amount of dry. They never even noticed.

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Offline FurMonster Mom

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Re: Tips And Tricks For Transitioning To Wet
« Reply #3 on: August 07, 2013, 11:53:02 PM »
First thing we did was quit the free feeding, and move to scheduled and measured out feedings.  That got them used to the idea of "when it's time to eat, you eat, because that's all yer gittin".

Second thing we did was start mixing a little wet in like a gravy.  Just a half tablespoon or so. 

Slowly, over the course of a couple weeks, we would mix in a bit more wet, and use a little less dry.

I agree that any food transition should be taken slow and gradual.
However, I also took the stance that I was going to be more stubborn than they.  If they balked at a meal, I didn't sweat it.  If they balked at 2 meals, I still didn't sweat it.  Three meals, okay... I'd take it back a step.  But it rarely came to that.
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Offline Lola

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Re: Tips And Tricks For Transitioning To Wet
« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2013, 02:20:26 AM »
It seems people are ALWAYS asking about transitioning to wet.  That is why I thought this topic was a good idea.  Soooo many think the process will be a piece of cake.  Sometimes it is.  But when it isn't, they give up. 
Plus, sooooo much depends on the cat, circumstances, the one owned by the cat, etc.  There is no "cut and dried" system.  IMHO

Our first experience involved 4 felines.   Whew...what an experience!  lol  However, it DID make it pretty much easy peasy with the next four... that joined the family, at different times.  It may have helped too... new home, new food, and everyone else is eating the wet stuff! 
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Offline Lola

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Re: Tips And Tricks For Transitioning To Wet
« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2013, 02:27:12 AM »
First thing we did was quit the free feeding, and move to scheduled and measured out feedings.  That got them used to the idea of "when it's time to eat, you eat, because that's all yer gittin".

Second thing we did was start mixing a little wet in like a gravy.  Just a half tablespoon or so. 

Slowly, over the course of a couple weeks, we would mix in a bit more wet, and use a little less dry.

I agree that any food transition should be taken slow and gradual.
However, I also took the stance that I was going to be more stubborn than they.  If they balked at a meal, I didn't sweat it.  If they balked at 2 meals, I still didn't sweat it.  Three meals, okay... I'd take it back a step.  But it rarely came to that.

That was the first thing we did also.  Stopped the free feeding.  Our Leonard was NOT happy with a feeding schedule.  He let us know it... loud and clear!  lol 
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Offline Lola

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Re: Tips And Tricks For Transitioning To Wet
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2013, 02:42:48 AM »
Lilly was the EASIEST to transition to wet.  She was 5 ish years old, when she joined the family.  She was previously free fed dry.  She was an indoor/outdoor cat.  I'm GUESSING she was probably used to many food textures, flavors, etc... from catching some of her meals and/or snacks from outside. 
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Offline Catgirl64

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Re: Tips And Tricks For Transitioning To Wet
« Reply #7 on: December 09, 2017, 02:48:21 PM »
My cats did it themselves. 

I had tried a few months ago, with very limited success.  I was wasting a lot of food, which I cannot afford to do, so I had more or less given up, and had them on a grain-free kibble that is supposed to be for both dogs and cats.  They were eating it without complaint and seemed to be fine until I got the last batch of food.  I don't know what changed, but something did, and starting a few days ago, they would only nibble, or just sniff the food and walk away.  My two little dogs didn't want it anymore, either.

Fortunately, I still had quite a bit of good canned food still on hand for the cats, and a couple of bags of Tylee's for my dogs in the freezer, so I started offering that, and they haven't touched the kibble since. 

I think one of the biggest obstacles before was the fact that everyone was used to being free-fed, and when I realized they were not eating the kibble like they used to, they were hungry enough to accept the wet food.  They were not starving - I learned the hard way years ago to make sure that every cat eats every day - but they were definitely hungry. 

Offline DeeDee

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Re: Tips And Tricks For Transitioning To Wet
« Reply #8 on: December 09, 2017, 07:19:08 PM »
You have to be so careful these days with kibble. You never know which independent company is going to be the next sellout to the giants. That's how I've lost my favorite training treats, Zukes, and my favorite small treats, Merricks Kitchen Bites, to hand out when walking into the house.

When someone sells out, the biggie always makes changes, and never for the best. Sometimes it takes a couple of years to completely change things the way they want, but it happens. You can watch the differences in the package wording, and ingredients, occur over time.

I had to just go back to making time for making them all. I decided there's no use in my falling dependent on something just to have it taken away by Purina, or Mars, or any of the other biggies--when research to find new ones takes just about as long as making a big batch.

It sure would be nice though if I had something I could depend on to have as a back-up to me.

« Last Edit: December 09, 2017, 07:21:22 PM by DeeDee »
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Offline Middle Child

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Re: Tips And Tricks For Transitioning To Wet
« Reply #9 on: December 09, 2017, 08:31:10 PM »
No need to be careful at all.  Just don't feed it.   Silly7

But I know what you mean about needing a back up.  I still haven't found a canned food for back up for Mazy cat.  I absolutely panicked that day I came home from work and the power was out.  I had nothing to feed her.  Nothing at all.  I opened a can of Tiki cat left over from Jennie's canned days and Queen Eva and Jennie ate it and had no trouble with it, I didn't anticipate they would, after all.  Mazy cat ate the tiny bit I gave her it and puked it right back up. And I only gave her about 0.25 ounce.

I still mourn daily over the loss of the By Nature organic line.  It was the only commercial processed canned food Mazy can keep down.  The ONLY. It wasn't really all that great, what with the pea fiber and the menadione.  But it was organic, did not contain carrageenan, was low carb, and she could keep it down.

Anyway I didn't participate in this thread originally because I never had to transition from dry to wet.  All my cats have been fed wet since 1985, when my male cat Baby blocked and the vet told me I must never ever feed my cats dry food.

But then, 20 years later Mazy cat came, from the shelter already on that Hills c/d toxic garbage, and somehow I let the vets (I went through 3) tell me she HAD to be on it and heaven help me I listened for 6 years, before the daily puking became twice daily and I finally woke up.. At the very high cost she and I now pay for daily.  But she didn't need weaning off kibble.  She loved canned food. Of course by the time I switched her it was too late, she couldn't keep most of those down either. I don't know why I listened to those idiotic vets for so long.

She did take effort to transition to raw though.

Offline Lola

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Re: Tips And Tricks For Transitioning To Wet
« Reply #10 on: December 09, 2017, 08:46:59 PM »
I transitioned from kibble to canned.  Raw was just toooooooo big of a jump, for me to wrap my head around... for a long time.
If I remember correctly, Jenkins (the last one to join the family) is the only one that went directly from kibble to raw. 

If a person is willing and able to feed raw... skip the canned step.  Less hassle in the long run.  IMHO 

« Last Edit: December 09, 2017, 08:50:08 PM by Lola »
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Offline Pookie

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Re: Tips And Tricks For Transitioning To Wet
« Reply #11 on: December 09, 2017, 10:45:54 PM »
My cats did it themselves. 

multistars  Pawsome!  And kudos to you for keeping the canned on hand and giving it another go.   thumbsup1

Like MC, I learned the hard way about dry food.  Transitioning wasn't a problem for me, because I had fed both wet and dry from the beginning, and they loved the wet -- it was like a treat to them.  So when I finally started learning all of the issues with dry, all I had to do was remove it and feed more canned.  True, Pookie especially would look for the dry, walking by the area where the feeder had been, but all in all, it was easy.  I did have to feed the canned in small meals (2 "breakfasts" and 2 "dinners" about 40 minutes apart), because by then, the damage from the dry had already been done to their tummies, but you find a way to make it work, you know?

Do you have different brands and proteins available to feed them?  If not, and you can afford it, it's a good idea, in case one manufacturer has a recall, you have other options, and different proteins helps reduce the chance of someone developing an allergy to a certain protein.

Congratulations on getting them switched!   DrLisaPiersonWorthy DrLisaPiersonWorthy
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Offline Catgirl64

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Re: Tips And Tricks For Transitioning To Wet
« Reply #12 on: December 10, 2017, 06:49:53 AM »
multistars  Pawsome!  And kudos to you for keeping the canned on hand and giving it another go.   thumbsup1

Do you have different brands and proteins available to feed them?  If not, and you can afford it, it's a good idea, in case one manufacturer has a recall, you have other options, and different proteins helps reduce the chance of someone developing an allergy to a certain protein.

Congratulations on getting them switched!   DrLisaPiersonWorthy DrLisaPiersonWorthy

Right now, I am feeding whatever canned I can afford, or, more accurately, mixing what I can with what I really can't.  Canned is just a step toward the final goal of homemade, and ultimately, raw.  I think it will be lots better for them, and after I took a look at the cost of even the most marginally acceptable canned food, probably cheaper in the long run, as well.  (I have some mad bargain-hunting skills.)  I hate it that cost is a consideration, but sadly, with six cats and two dogs, it is.

The cats will be getting the same meats we eat, with the exception of fish.  They will also get eggs, if they like them.  I know food allergies are a thing, but I've always wondered if it's really any kind of meat that is responsible.  I don't honestly know anything about it, but it seems counterintuitive to me.  Some other ingredient or additive seems like a more likely culprit.  How can a carnivore be allergic to meat?  I need to learn more about that, I guess. 
« Last Edit: December 10, 2017, 07:05:00 AM by Catgirl64 »

Offline Middle Child

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Re: Tips And Tricks For Transitioning To Wet
« Reply #13 on: December 10, 2017, 08:36:44 AM »
Quote
I know food allergies are a thing, but I've always wondered if it's really any kind of meat that is responsible.

Often what is found, when going raw is that a cat who would seemed "allergic" to , say chicken, in the highly processed commercial foods, had no trouble with chicken in it's raw form.

I also agree with you though, Catgirl, that it could be any other of those horrible ingredients, or simply the way the food is so processed, that is causing the allergic symptoms.

Also remember, that intolerance is different from allergy.  allergies present as skin problems, such as sores on the face, around the neck or ears, or bald patches from excessive licking or itching.  Intolerance would present as regurgitating it back up.

Another thing to consider is that any positive change may seem like the final answer - at first.  Once the new food is in place and time goes on, the problem may reassert itself, on a smaller scale.

My Mazy cat for instance cannot tolerate any food that ins not certified organic non-GMO Project Verified.

But when I first took her off the disgusting Hills, the improvement was dramatic.  then she started puking up the canned foods.  I found an organic line (now defunct) that she could keep down and she was better again, then she started having more problems.  I went to raw which led to more improvement, but after a few months she wasn't tolerating the raw either, and that was when I realized she was going to have to have all organic meats and eggs.  She still has problems, she'll never be completely healed, but she is much better now.

I think I've gone off topic I've lost track of the subject with all my lecturing. haha.

Offline Middle Child

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Re: Tips And Tricks For Transitioning To Wet
« Reply #14 on: December 10, 2017, 08:41:13 AM »
multistars  Pawsome!  And kudos to you for keeping the canned on hand and giving it another go.   thumbsup1

Like MC, I learned the hard way about dry food. 

To clarify, I already knew dry food was bad for cats.  In 1985 my male cat Baby blocked when he was barely 2 years old.  He was my only cat at the time, and the vet told me how bad dry was for cats at that time. Shortly after that I took in a 6 year old female who was being fed, of all horrible things, Tender Vittles.  She also had urinary tract issues, but Baby was already on canned food by then, and Sissy went right to a wet diet as well and never had another issue.

I don't know what happened, why I was so dumb about Mazy cat coming from the shelter on that Hills garbage. I will never forgive myself for it.

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