Author Topic: Noise Fear. . .  (Read 850 times)

Offline DeeDee

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Noise Fear. . .
« on: May 17, 2016, 09:51:51 PM »
This new gel from Zoetis is for noise-fear in dogs. http://news.zoetis.com/press-release/companion-animals/zoetis-announces-launch-sileo-treatment-noise-aversion-dogs and vets are supposed to have it REALLY soon.
 
It’s supposed to be non-sedating, but I looked up dexmedetomidine, and I’m not so sure about what it is since this is the same chemical drug name, but is info for humans:
 
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1291306/


I couldn't decide which parts of those articles to snip, so I didn't at all. Anyone interested will just have to go read both.
"In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn't merely try to train him to be semihuman. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming partly a dog." Edward Hoagland
"Thorns may hurt you, men desert you, sunlight turn to fog; but you're never friendless ever, if you have a dog."

Offline DeeDee

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Re: Noise Fear. . .and Sileo
« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2016, 07:33:35 AM »
My vet was going to provide it for people that absolutely wanted to try it, BUT wasn't going to recommend it for V&B. He's not all on board with it until he sees the effects in other cases.

Dr. Judy Morgan isn't all on board with it either, and there are several reasons why when she goes into explaining it:

Quote
New Noise Aversion Drug Could Be Dangerous

Since we just celebrated our nation’s independence with lots of fireworks and we are now entering summer thunderstorm season where we live, I have had plenty of questions from clients and subscribers asking about the new “Noise Aversion Drug”, Sileo. This drug is actually dexmedetomidine, which is a sedative and pain relief medication used for surgical, dental, and clinical procedures. I have used dexmedetomidine quite often for patients in my hospital. Normally, all goes well and procedures go smoothly. However, we routinely monitor EKG, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, and body temperature when animals are under sedation with this drug. We commonly see decreased heart rate, decreased blood pressure, decreased body temperature, and sometimes heart arrhythmias. This does not cause great concern because we have the animals in a controlled situation where we can give intravenous fluids, oxygen, warming support, and reversal agents to bring them back out of sedation.

Continued in link:

http://www.drjudymorgan.com/new-noise-aversion-drug-could-be-dangerous/
« Last Edit: July 08, 2016, 07:36:21 AM by DeeDee »
"In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn't merely try to train him to be semihuman. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming partly a dog." Edward Hoagland
"Thorns may hurt you, men desert you, sunlight turn to fog; but you're never friendless ever, if you have a dog."

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