Author Topic: Declawing is De toeing  (Read 176 times)

Offline DeeDee

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Declawing is De toeing
« on: March 09, 2018, 03:59:01 PM »
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Declawing is not just a simple nail trim – it’s actually a procedure that amputates a cat’s toe. If you love your feline friend, you should NEVER subject him to this cruel procedure.

⚫ A More Accurate Name for Declawing: 'De-toeing' ⚫
Dr. Aubrey Lavizzo, a veterinarian and anti-declaw advocate practicing in Colorado has, like so many in our profession, performed onychectomies at the insistence of cat-owning clients. In an interview with the Denver Post, Lavizzo made the point that the procedure should really be called de-toeing, because it's not a nail trim, it's amputation of the cat's toes.

Declawing removes the claw, bones, nerves, the joint capsule, collateral ligaments and the extensor or flexor tendons. Amputation of the third phalanx or the first toe bone that houses the nail drastically alters the conformation of the feet, which can lead to a host of physical complications such as chronic small bone arthritis, degenerative joint disease and neuralgia.

"As veterinarians, we take an oath that we will use our knowledge and skills to benefit society through the relief of pain in our animal clients," says Lavizzo. "When you talk about pain in cats, it's classified as mild, moderate and severe. Mild is a neuter. Moderate is a spay. And severe is a declaw."

Because the feline claw grows right out of the bone, during declawing, it's common for veterinarians to miss a tiny piece of bone that subsequently grows back as a partial nail or bone fragment. The missed piece can continue to grow under the skin, pressing into tissue and nerves, or it can grow right through the skin.

Dr. Lavizzo studies declawed cats and keeps records of bone fragments and bone spurs left behind after declawing procedures. He believes the pain caused by those missed pieces of bone may result in behavior changes like biting and eliminating outside the litterbox.

"We always see the same thing, because it's so hard to do this procedure perfectly," Lavizzo told the Post. "You can't predict a successful outcome, and if you can't predict a successful outcome, then you shouldn't do the procedure."

It is estimated the vast majority (80 percent) of declawed cats have at least one complication resulting from the surgery, and over a third develop behavior problems afterward.

⚫ So Why Are Cats Still Being Declawed? ⚫
Cat owners who still favor declawing typically either don't understand what the procedure actually does to a kitty's feet, or are more concerned with being scratched or having their furniture or other belongings damaged than with the risks and pain involved in onychectomy. Many veterinarians who are still willing to perform declaws believe they're doing it to save cats who would otherwise be relinquished to shelters.

The ASPCA and the Cat Fanciers Association oppose declawing. The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) takes the position that declawing should be considered only after attempts have been made to prevent the cat from using its claws destructively or when its clawing presents a zoonotic risk for its owner(s).

The AVMA has also published a literature review on the welfare implications of declawing on cats. It's important to note that the U.S. is behind the curve when it comes to banning declaws. According to a recent article in Newsweek:

"In some cities and many countries, declawing is considered so inhumane that it is illegal. Article 10 of the European Convention for the Protection of Pet Animals bans declawing, along with defanging, docking ears and tails, and removing the vocal cords of a pet.

There are only a few exceptions to these rules; specifically, when a vet deems the procedures necessary to the animal's well-being. The same goes for Australia, Brazil, San Francisco and, possibly in the near future, Denver."

My hope is that ultimately every state in America will ban declaws for humane reasons, and that all animal advocacy groups, in particular the AVMA, will come out in full opposition to the procedure.

⚫ Alternatives to Declawing ⚫
Cats are digitigrades, meaning they walk on their toes. Most other mammals, including humans, walk on the soles of their feet. Kitties use their claws for balance, exercise and stretching and toning the muscles of their legs, back, shoulders and paws. Cats who roam outdoors (which I don't recommend) use their claws to hunt and capture prey, to escape or defend against predators, and as part of feline marking behavior.

At the risk of discouraging people from acquiring cats as pets, I suggest that if you absolutely can't live with an animal companion who has sharp claws and scratches things with them, you might want to avoid getting a kitty. Alternatively, you can check with your local shelters and rescue groups for homeless cats that have already been declawed.

If you have or plan to adopt a kitty with claws, the humane solution to unwanted scratching is to provide sensible, appealing options for your cat. Felines have claws for a reason, and as long as they have them, they'll use them. Just as most humans need to trim their nails weekly, it may be necessary to trim your cat's nails weekly or at least every couple of weeks.

In addition to regular nail trims, I also recommend cat guardians provide at least two different scratching surfaces, including a tall, sturdy scratching post and a horizontal scratching mat. In addition to providing your kitty with appropriate surfaces to scratch, you must also take steps to protect any off-limits areas your cat is scratching.

Depending on what surfaces you want to protect, consider using one or a combination of kitty scratching deterrents, such as aluminum foil, double-sided tape, plastic sheeting, plastic carpet runners, car or chair mats with the spiky sides up, or inflated balloons.

There are also herbal sprays available that are designed to replace your pet's paw pad scent markers on furniture or other surfaces with an odor that will discourage him from returning to that spot. You can also consider covering your cat's nails with commercially available nail caps, which will help protect both you and your belongings from those sharp claws.

Now, there are some cats that no matter what you do, will continue to scratch forbidden surfaces and potentially damage your belongings. After all, one of the most fascinating things about having a cat around the house is you're sharing your life with a creature that will never be entirely domesticated. Bottom line: Clawing and scratching goes with the territory when you're a cat parent, and the solution should never, ever be to cut off your pet's toes.

Read more here: http://bit.ly/2oX64M7


From: https://www.facebook.com/doctor.karen.becker/photos/a.114512537747.98672.113688237747/10156155294432748/
"In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn't merely try to train him to be semihuman. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming partly a dog." Edward Hoagland
"Thorns may hurt you, men desert you, sunlight turn to fog; but you're never friendless ever, if you have a dog."

Offline Lola

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Re: Declawing is De toeing
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2018, 04:43:00 PM »
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Cats are digitigrades, meaning they walk on their toes. Most other mammals, including humans, walk on the soles of their feet. Kitties use their claws for balance, exercise and stretching and toning the muscles of their legs, back, shoulders and paws.
Everything you NEED to know about caring for your feline. www.catinfo.org

Offline ThreeStep

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Re: Declawing is De toeing
« Reply #2 on: March 10, 2018, 07:25:16 AM »
I have to confess that ChaCha is declawed, front only. We did not notice it or were told about it when we adopted her. She is now almost nine years old and signs of issues to come are showing. It hurts when our pretty and big girl sits down carefully and jerks her front feet up, placing them more carefully. Who gets a Bengal/Tabby, has it mutilated to protect furniture and throws it out when expecting a child a few months later - it is called human bangshead

Offline Middle Child

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Re: Declawing is De toeing
« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2018, 07:28:24 AM »
You can take her in and have her paws x rayed.  She may need corrective surgery.  If possible look for a non-declawing vet, or even better, one already skilled in paw repair surgery.  The Paw Project has lists of vets who don't declaw, and you can also contact Paw Project directly for a vet who knows how to do the repair surgery.

http://www.pawproject.org/no-declaw-vets/

She may also need something to help with arthritis.

Offline Lola

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Re: Declawing is De toeing
« Reply #4 on: March 10, 2018, 09:59:35 AM »
I have to confess that ChaCha is declawed, front only. We did not notice it or were told about it when we adopted her. She is now almost nine years old and signs of issues to come are showing. It hurts when our pretty and big girl sits down carefully and jerks her front feet up, placing them more carefully. Who gets a Bengal/Tabby, has it mutilated to protect furniture and throws it out when expecting a child a few months later - it is called human bangshead

I think it is great that YOU adopted ChaCha!  You are aware of declawing issues, and can help her.   KissLick
Everything you NEED to know about caring for your feline. www.catinfo.org

Offline ThreeStep

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Re: Declawing is De toeing
« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2018, 09:45:18 AM »
She is on supplements for her ligaments and on six months vet visits if she likes it or not. It does not slow her down when she decides to go.

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