Author Topic: Coconut Oil  (Read 8076 times)

Offline Shadow

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Re: Coconut Oil
« Reply #15 on: April 15, 2012, 05:53:50 PM »
Hi MC here is the links
http://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/abs/10.2460/ajvr.71.4.435


also
don’t know if this is the article but Dr. Wendy Brooks rights for VIN. But this states that long chain triglycerides are the problem.

 

The second step in treatment is dietary though success has been mixed. Traditionally, rather nasty tasting Medium Chain Triglycerides have been used in lymphangiectasia treatment. Triglycerides (a fancy word for “fats”) are very long molecules. Some are longer than others. The more usual dietary fats are called “Long Chain Triglycerides” and, when absorbed into one’s body, must be repackaged into fat globules called “chylomicra” and are normally absorbed into the lacteals. In lymphangiectasia, we want to reduce the pressure in the lymph vessels. We want less lymph. The idea was that if the patient ate shorter fat chains, the fats could be absorbed right into bloodstream directly and bypass the lymph system altogether. Whether or not this actually happens is still a matter of controversy but the addition of Medium Chain Triglycerides (or “MCT’s”) in conjunction with a low fat diet are common recommendations in the therapy of lymphangiectasia.

http://www.marvistavet.com/html/intestinal_lymphangiectasia.html

 
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Offline Shadow

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Re: Coconut Oil
« Reply #16 on: April 15, 2012, 10:54:25 PM »
The following is quoted from an article written by Dr. Linda Kennedy MS SLP ND  "Coconut Oil for Pets?  The effects of coconut oil are not only limited to humans.  It is safe for use in domestic animals like cats and dogs too.  Coconut oil helps minimize flea allergies and helps eliminate odours from pet coats.  Consumption of coconut oil by cats also helps to eliminate fur balls.  Coconut oil can even by applied directly to the skin to promote healing of scratches and bites.  Recommended dosages are ½ teaspoon per day in cats and 1 to 2 teaspoons a day for dogs depending on body weight."  http://www.tiana-coconut.com/benefits_coconut_oil.html

 

http://healthypets.mercola.com/groups/healthypets/forum/t/101030.aspx

 

I think the key is to make it extra virgin, organic and give it in small doses.
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Offline Middle Child

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Re: Coconut Oil
« Reply #17 on: April 16, 2012, 09:11:53 PM »
I'm not going there again.  While my vet and the oncologist said they doubt the coconut oil had anything to do with his cancer, how can they know for sure.  Sure he had illnesses but it was three weeks after I started the coconut oil that he started swelling up, and he was gone 19 days later.

The other three liked it a lot, and their coats were glossy but.....for me, it's not worth the potential of risk.  Those pages my vet gave me on medium chain triglyceride fatty oils were very specific that cats should not have medium chain oils from any source, including coconut oil.

Offline Mo

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Re: Coconut Oil
« Reply #18 on: July 11, 2012, 10:14:33 PM »
Despite the potential risks of using coconut oil I am going to try it for "Baldy".  I bought some raw, organic, extra virgin, cold pressed, fair trade, GMO free, coconut oil today (how is that for a mouth full?).  I figured that was the best kind possible - it also came in a glass jar which is also recommended.  I tried rubbing it on his fur for the first time today - starting with just a small patch to see if he is allergic to it as well.  I'll try keep everyone updated on how this is going. 

If this doesn't work the next try is local raw honey and then Silver Biotics.  I'm really willing to just try anything at this point!

Backstory:

Baldy (he really has no name) is a four year old DSH cat.  He has been mostly bald since the age of two due to severe allergies.  He was surrendered to the shelter 6 months ago and they asked me to see if I could help him so I have had him for the past several months.  I've tried everything I could think of - limited ingredient diets (as in just plain raw duck and salmon) for several weeks.  Neem Oil Shampoo, DE, Vetericyn, salmon oil, skin supplements, allergy shots (steriods), etc etc.  He is allergic to chicken, turkey, fleas, grass, most other green plants, any sort of allergy medication/shot, most hypoallergenic shampoos and other supplements, and likely more that I haven't found out yet. 

Every vet he has been to has recommended euthanizing him.


Offline Mo

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Re: Coconut Oil
« Reply #19 on: July 11, 2012, 10:53:15 PM »
A little more since it is to late to edit my post. 

He also scratches his skin raw, my clipping his nails helps control that a little.  But that is another reason why I am so desperate to find something that actually helps! 

Offline DeeDee

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Re: Coconut Oil
« Reply #20 on: October 05, 2012, 08:57:27 PM »
Strange...I just saw a raw-meat-+-coconut product at the bottom of this article:

http://coconutoil.com/how-to-feed-your-dog-or-cat-coconut-oil/

Anyone else ever heard of that Tropical Traditions brand?
"In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn't merely try to train him to be semihuman. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming partly a dog." Edward Hoagland
"Thorns may hurt you, men desert you, sunlight turn to fog; but you're never friendless ever, if you have a dog."

Offline Middle Child

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Re: Coconut Oil
« Reply #21 on: October 05, 2012, 11:11:10 PM »
Despite the potential risks of using coconut oil I am going to try it for "Baldy".  I bought some raw, organic, extra virgin, cold pressed, fair trade, GMO free, coconut oil today (how is that for a mouth full?).  I figured that was the best kind possible - it also came in a glass jar which is also recommended.  I tried rubbing it on his fur for the first time today - starting with just a small patch to see if he is allergic to it as well.  I'll try keep everyone updated on how this is going. 

If this doesn't work the next try is local raw honey and then Silver Biotics.  I'm really willing to just try anything at this point!

Backstory:

Baldy (he really has no name) is a four year old DSH cat.  He has been mostly bald since the age of two due to severe allergies.  He was surrendered to the shelter 6 months ago and they asked me to see if I could help him so I have had him for the past several months.  I've tried everything I could think of - limited ingredient diets (as in just plain raw duck and salmon) for several weeks.  Neem Oil Shampoo, DE, Vetericyn, salmon oil, skin supplements, allergy shots (steriods), etc etc.  He is allergic to chicken, turkey, fleas, grass, most other green plants, any sort of allergy medication/shot, most hypoallergenic shampoos and other supplements, and likely more that I haven't found out yet. 

Every vet he has been to has recommended euthanizing him.



I missed this post when you made it, Mo.  How's it going for this boy? In a nothing to lose situation such as this, I heartily approve the use of coconut oil for him and I hope it is helping him.



Strange...I just saw a raw-meat-+-coconut product at the bottom of this article:

http://coconutoil.com/how-to-feed-your-dog-or-cat-coconut-oil/

Anyone else ever heard of that Tropical Traditions brand?

Haven't heard of it before, but I stopped researching it after deciding it was not safe for cats.

Offline Mo

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Re: Coconut Oil
« Reply #22 on: October 08, 2012, 09:48:04 PM »

Here he is when he first arrived.  This is before he started really scratching himself raw.  That started a few months later. 


Here is a picture of him tonight, after having coconut oil rubbed on his back (he doesn't let me do more) for a few months.  I used about 32 ounces worth of coconut oil. 


Offline DeeDee

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Re: Coconut Oil
« Reply #23 on: October 09, 2012, 12:41:03 PM »
It seems to me that the topical use of coconut oil is working with his obvious allergies. I know it helps heal cuts faster--I just grab it after disinfecting it as if it were an antibiotic ointment & throw a band-aid on it.

One thing I have to point out--though he's getting better, straw and hay are awfully itchy things--used to break me out badly during haying season when storing the baled hay--A solid red, slightly raised rash even in the places I was fully covered. Lord did that itch!!!! I used to think of it as being as bad as poison ivy. After all it contains all the same pollen that the plant had.

After a couple of years of Dr. visits every time, I was relegated to the kitchen to do the cooking for everyone else. Besides being allergic to the pollen in most every plant on earth, I'm also now allergic to:

cats
rabbits
guinea pigs
pet mice
pet rats
hamsters
gerbils

Actually, anything alive and with fur--a LOT of Allerpet is used on my dogs for me to tolerate living with them. They are one thing I think of as not an option to get rid of when I've had to give up everything else, and I've told my Dr's that's where I draw the line.

A coconut based, heavy conditioner is what's used with them when bathing because it seems to help cut down MY problems.

When nothing else helps, anything that works becomes the only option.
"In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn't merely try to train him to be semihuman. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming partly a dog." Edward Hoagland
"Thorns may hurt you, men desert you, sunlight turn to fog; but you're never friendless ever, if you have a dog."

Offline Middle Child

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Re: Coconut Oil
« Reply #24 on: October 17, 2012, 09:57:15 PM »
Oh Mo, wow!  I'm so happy for that little boy!  Well done!  So he isn't taking it internally (except for what he lickes off himself of course) you are just rubbing it in? 

Thanks for the update. How wonderful!

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